Upcoming Events

Spring 2018 Past Events

 

The Appalachian Origins of the Modern Civil Rights Movement in the USA

Thursday, February 22, 2018 at 6 PM
Humanities Lecture Hall
Speaker: Dr. William H. Turner, Research Scientist Leader of the Social Systems and Allied Research at Prairie View A&M University


"The Civil Rights Movement in Asheville, NC," the 2016 Master's thesis by Patrick S. Parker at Appalachian State University, chronicled the untold story of members of Asheville’s black community who led a peaceful movement to bring about racial equality in their town, leveraged against the town’s burgeoning tourism industry. This presentation frames the overall Modern  Civil Rights Movement in America around several key spaces, places, people, and events in Appalachia, sparking and nourishing the Movement.

Dr. William H. Turner focused his career on ethnographic studies and programmatic interventions among people of color in the Appalachian Region. Among the first to combine interests in the fields of African Americans and Appalachian Studies, Turner co-edited the path-breaking textbook, Blacks in Appalachia. His Thematic essay on Black Appalachians was published in the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.

Click here to view the flyer

Fall 2017 Past Events

 

Zebulon B. Vance Reconsidered" - Talk by Historian David Blight

Thursday, September 14, 2017
7:00 pm-8:30 pm
Lipinsky Hall - Auditorium


As part of a 2-day symposium, Zebulon B. Vance Reconsidered, Yale University Professor of History David Blight, will discuss Vance's life and legacy. This event is free and open to everyone at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 14 in Lipinsky Auditorium.

Seating capacity is limited and each symposium event is ticketed separately. Tickets are sold out. No backpacks will be allowed and bags will be checked at the door.

Vance, who served as a Confederate officer and then North Carolina governor during the Civil War, was imprisoned after the war. Later pardoned, he practiced as an attorney, and then became governor again and then U.S. Senator.

Commemorated with statues (like the one in Raleigh photographed above), monuments and historical sites, including the Vance Monument in downtown Asheville, and the Vance Birthplace near Weaverville, N.C., Vance's legacy is now being reexamined and debated.

David Blight, an expert on history and memory, and the author of many books about the Civil War and Reconstruction eras, is director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale.

The symposium will continue on Friday, Sept. 15, with a morning panel featuring eminent retired history professor Gordon McKinney; Steve Nash, assistant professor at East Tennessee State University; Joe Mobley, lecturer at NC State; and Darin Waters assistant professor of history at UNC Asheville.

Friday afternoon at 2 p.m., New York Times best-selling mystery writer Sharyn McCrumb, who has featured Vance frequently enough in her novels that she jokes, "I think I dated him in high school," will offer a talk about Vance.

The two Friday events - the 10 a.m. historian panel and the 2 p.m. talk by Sharyn McCrumb, will both take place in UNC Asheville's Sherrill Center, Mountain View Room 417.

Events in this series:
"Zebulon B. Vance Reconsidered" - Historian Panel with Gordon McKinney, Steve Nash, Joe Mobley and Darin Waters
"Zebulon B. Vance Reconsidered" - Talk by Sharyn McCrumb

Contact for this event:
Department of History
history@unca.edu
828.251.6415

Click here to view the PDF format of the flier

Click here to view the Smyposium Program

Flier and Program created by Jessica Parks, Humanities


"Zebulon B. Vance Reconsidered" - Historian Panel with Gordon McKinney, Steve Nash, Joe Mobley and Darin Waters

Friday, September 15, 2017
10:00 am-11:00 am
Sherrill Center - Mountain View Room 417


As part of a 2-day symposium, Zebulon B. Vance Reconsidered, a panel of historians will discuss Vance's life and legacy. The panel will feature eminent retired history professor Gordon McKinney; Steve Nash, assistant professor at East Tennessee State University; Joe Mobley, lecturer at NC State; and Darin Waters, assistant professor of history at UNC Asheville.

All symposium events are free and open to everyone. Seating capacity is limited and each symposium event is ticketed separately. Tickets are sold out. No backpacks will be allowed and bags will be checked at the door.

Vance, who served as a Confederate officer and then North Carolina governor during the Civil War, was imprisoned after the war. Later pardoned, he practiced as an attorney, and then became governor again and then U.S. Senator.

Commemorated with statues (like the one in Raleigh photographed above), monuments and historical sites, including the Vance Monument in downtown Asheville, and the Vance Birthplace near Weaverville, N.C., Vance's legacy is now being reexamined and debated.

Contact for this event:
Department of History
history@unca.edu
828.251.6415

Click here to view the PDF format of the flier

Click here to view the Smyposium Program

Flier and Program created by Jessica Parks, Humanities


Zebulon B. Vance Reconsidered" - Talk by Sharyn McCrumb

Friday, September 15, 2017
2:00 pm-3:30 pm
Sherrill Center - Mountain View Room 417


As part of a 2-day symposium, Zebulon B. Vance Reconsidered, New York Times best-selling mystery writer Sharyn McCrumb, will discuss Vance's life and legacy. McCrumb has featured Vance frequently enough in her novels that she jokes, "I think I dated him in high school." This talk takes place at 2 p.m.

All symposium events are free and open to everyone. Seating capacity is limited and each symposium event is ticketed separately. Tickets are sold out. No backpacks will be allowed and bags will be checked at the door.

Friday morning at 10 a.m., the symposium will feature a panel of historians, including eminent retired history professor Gordon McKinney; Steve Nash, assistant professor at East Tennessee State University; and Joe Mobley, lecturer at NC State.

Vance, who served as a Confederate officer and then North Carolina governor during the Civil War, was imprisoned after the war. Later pardoned, he practiced as an attorney, and then became governor again and then U.S. Senator.

Commemorated with statues (like the one in Raleigh photographed above), monuments and historical sites, including the Vance Monument in downtown Asheville, and the Vance Birthplace near Weaverville, N.C., Vance's legacy is now being reexamined and debated.

Contact for this event:
Department of History
history@unca.edu
828.251.6415

Click here to view the PDF format of the flier

Click here to view the Smyposium Program

Flier and Program created by Jessica Parks, Humanities


Diversity Hiring Lecture

Sponsored by: The History Department & the Office of the Provost

Keynote Speaker:
Dr. Richard Reddick, Assistant Vice President of Research and Policy, Office of the Vice President for Diversity and Community Engagement - University of Texas Austin

Campus and Community Racial Climate: Its Influence on Creating Inclusive Faculty Environments

A number of scholars have investigated the role of campus climate in creating diverse and inclusive university communities. However, there has been less discussion about the significance of the local (city/state) and national climate and its influence on how underrepresented faculty, staff, and students perceive a particular campus. Dr. Richard Reddick explores these questions, and proposes that campus and local communities, and even the national tenor regarding social justice and inclusion, are interweaved factors that impact how scholars perceive how welcoming - or exclusionary - university environments are. In this discussion, Dr. Reddick and the audience will posit strategies and approaches that university leaders can embrace that truly “move the needle” in regard to campus and community climate.

Date: Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 7:00 PM

Location: Mannheimer Room, REU 102

Contact Information:
History Department
828-251-6415
rsmyle@unca.edu

Click here for the PDF format of the flier

Flier created by René Smyle, History


History Majors Pizza Party

Come on out to this social gathering to meet faculty and fellow students, learn more about the History department and curriculum.
We hope to see you there!

Date: Tuesday, October, 3, 2017
Time: Noon
Location: Whitesides Hall, Room 016

Flier created by René Smyle, History


Making Hunger History: Global Famine and What Historians Can Do About It

Alum Douglas Palmer (‘96), Provost at Walsh University

When: Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 4:30 PM

Where: Laurel Forum, Karpen Hall

Free and open to the public

Right now, the world is facing five major famines. The United Nations estimates that food production will need to increase by 100% in the next 30 years to feed the global population. Both of these are likely going to be exasperated by the effects of global climate change. What do historians have to do with the present and the future? Dr. Douglas Palmer will argue that in the face of these and other global issues, the voice of historians is more important than ever. Students of history, he will argue, must have a “seat at the table” with scientists, social scientists and policy makers in order to best respond to the major issues of the 21st century.

Dr. Palmer graduated from UNCA in 1996 with a degree in history where he was the Phi Alpha Theta Award winner and president of the PTA chapter. He then earned his MA from the University of Oregon and a Ph.D. in history from Ohio State University. He was a Fulbright Scholar in 2001-2002 at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands and then a Research Fellow at the Center of Law and History at Emory University. He has been at Walsh University in North Canton, Ohio since 2005 where he has been a professor of history, chair of the Division of Humanities, Executive Director of Global Learning, Associate Dean of Academic Innovation and now is the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs.

Dr. Palmer looks forward to returning to UNCA to speak with the Phi Alpha Theta students. He has fond memories of classes with Dr. Rizzo, Spellman and Hardy. He believes his greatest accomplishment at UNCA was organizing an epic croquet match which pitted the history department against the philosophy department. The historians, naturally, triumphed.

Click here to view the PDF format of the flier

Flier created by René Smyle, History


Elizabeth I and the Power and Language of Gifts

Carole Levin, Professor of History at the University of Nebraska

When: Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 6:00 PM

Where: Laurel Forum, Karpen Hall

Free and open to the public

In this talk Dr. Carole Levin will examine the problematic relationships of royal gifts between Queen Elizabeth I and a number of women in her life. These included her older half-sister Mary, whom Elizabeth was afraid might have her executed during her reign and  her cousin Mary Stuart who created elaborate gifts for Elizabeth but was also probably conspiring her death. None of these gifts, as gorgeous as they might be, were about affection: they were all about power.

Dr. Carole Levin is Willa Cather Professor of History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She has won awards for her teaching from SUNY/New Paltz and the University of Nebraska. She is the author or editor of seventeen books, including The Heart and Stomach of a King: Elizabeth I and the Politics of Sex and Power (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013; 2nd ed.) and Dreaming the English Renaissance (Palgrave, 2008). Recent books include the edited collection, Scholars and Poets Talk about Queens (Palgrave, 2105) and the co-edited, with Anna Riehl Bertolet and Jo Eldridge Carney, of A Biographical Encyclopedia of Early Modern Englishwomen 1500–1650: Exemplary Lives and Memorable Acts (Routledge, 2016). She has held long-term fellowships at both the Newberry Library in Chicago and the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, and in 2015 she was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of York in England.

Click here to view the PDF format of the flier

Flier created by René Smyle, History